Belle Annee: After the Crawfish Boil

From the beginning of February until the beginning of June, New Orleanians go into a festive frenzy.  It begins with Mardi Gras, then the first warm weekend that falls, followed by St. Patrick’s Day, St. Joseph’s Day, Easter, French Quarter Fest, Jazz Fest and then end of school and start of summer vacations.  The frenzy is not this collection of special events but rather the accessory to all of it:   The frenzy is Crawfish Season.  

The big plastic letters outside of Big Fisherman on Magazine Street or KJeans in Mid City  spell out the magic words “Hot Boiled Crawfish Today” and those signs remain until the beginning of summer.  During that time the seafood departments of grocery stores smell differently, weekends are planned differently, we look at draft beer with more affinity, and our Mardi Gras cups get used with more frequency.

Crawfish boils are comprised of collecting newspapers, setting up plastic tables, ordering kegs of beer, purging the crawfish, chopping the veggies, getting the seasoning juuuust so and then, finally, boiling the crawfish.   Friends and family tear into the steaming red trough of crustaceans, picking their favorite accoutrements along the way – potatoes, corn, mushrooms, sausage, and maybe artichokes and garlic.  Everyone comments on the size of the crawfish, the seasoning and the weather and they stand shoulder to shoulder pinching the tails, sucking the heads and enjoying their part in this Southern Louisiana ritual.

There is a a backside to all of this for the host though.  When the friends have gone, when the tables are folded up, and when the garbage has been relocated to black contractor bags for pick up early Monday morning, there is usually – almost always – a leftover pile of crawfish that did not get eaten.  So much work goes into the boil that it is disproportionately painful to discard anything uneaten, but what are you really going to do with any leftovers?  There is not enough to make Crawfish Étouffée or or Crawfish Bisque and too many to just quickly peel them and pop them into your mouth.

I pondered this while eating my very own pile of crawfish at a friend’s boil recently.  I looked around and realized the key to a good leftover recipe is finding a use not just for the crawfish but for the veggies and extras also.  That’s how you differentiate it from just a plain crawfish recipe.  And that is where Sunday Morning Crawfish Crepes come in.

Embrace the Saturday-afternoon crawfish boil as your first step toward Sunday brunch.  With advance planning you have a great use not just for your leftover crawfish but for any of the “extras” you can snag including corn, garlic, mushrooms, sausage and just about anything else.  The key to this being a success is to split up the work making the crepes on Friday, grabbing your leftover crawfish on Saturday and then mixing everything together on Sunday.

The recipe is really simple.  The basic idea is to peel your crawfish, cut up your veggies and add them to a spicy béchamel .  Then ladle that into and over crepes with asparagus.  The asparagus aren’t really that crawfish boil-y but they do look nice and the fresh green crunch adds to an otherwise rich filling.

So fold up the plastic tables and break out the wine glasses and silverware: Brunch is served!

Click here for the recipe!

For more from Jessica Bride, visit www.belleannee.com.